Articles After Hip Joint Surgery: Exercise Critical To Recovery

After Hip Joint Surgery: Exercise Critical To Recovery

hip joint replacement doctorAll-too-common conditions, such as osteoarthritis, compel a surprising number of Americans to have joint replacement surgeries. In 2013, 719,000 Americans underwent knee joint replacement surgery; another 332,000 U.S. men and women needed total hip joint replacement surgery. While these numbers may seem daunting, there is some good news. It is possible to regain full functionality and a great deal of mobility after surgery. Hip joint replacement doctors and healthcare professionals specializing in joint replacement share the best ways to do it.

Exercise May Seem Counterproductive, But It’s A Must
Yes, stretching and exercising after surgery may be painful or uncomfortable, but doctors agree: it speeds up recovery, plain and simple. Following major surgeries, it is not wise to do it alone. “It is important to commit to a rehab plan and work with your surgeon and physical therapist to continuously set goals,” Healthline explains. Make sure all exercises, stretches, and routines get approval from a hip joint replacement doctor or general practitioner first. In most cases, doctors and physical therapists will recommend low-impact exercises, such as swimming and cycling, according to The New York Times. Stretching, yoga, and restorative pilates may also be on the table.

The Most Important Thing
During this process, the most important thing is not to give up. It can be tempting to resign yourself to inactivity because you have a valid excuse (“I just had joint replacement surgery!”). It can be especially difficult for patients unaccustomed to exercise (or for patients who already struggled with their weight) to suddenly adopt a regular stretching and exercise routine. Motivation and effort are all it takes. You don’t need to knock it out of the park every single day, you just need to put in a valid effort and improve over time.

You’ve made it through prep for surgery and total hip replacement surgery. Unfortunately, it’s not necessarily over. Now it’s time to recover — and that takes hard work, usually in the form of stretching and exercise.

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